Kama Burwell's blog

Professional Permaculture Designers Hui

9am July 1st to 3pm July 2nd, NEW PLYMOUTH.

This hui is for professional permaculture designers.

It is an opportunity to get together with other PC designers, share our work & our professional processes, share our skills & strengths, learn from others, and explore opportunities to collaborate.

This hui is part of the "Making Permaculture Stronger" series of hui in Aotearoa NZ.

Tips for a Diverse, Resilient Landscape

Latest article by my GreenBridge colleague Bena Denton ... published in the local paper...

We talk about resilience today, the way we talked about sustainability yesterday. The ability to anticipate risk, navigate change, and bounce back is a key component of resilience. How do you design resilience into your landscape to ensure your edible garden or lifestyle block is able to weather a drought, cope with a changing climate, and consistently provide fodder for animals, bees, and your table? Well, we can start with diversity.

Shelterbelts can be juicy!

Here is GreenBridge's latest monthly article for our local newspaper...

Single row, single species, trimmed shelterbelts have their place. But by thinking outside the square, we can achieve great shelter while gaining lots of other benefits too…. writes Kama Burwell.

The opportunities with shelterbelts are exciting. We can design shelterbelts so they also provide bee fodder, bird & insect habitat, rongoa/medicine, fruit, nuts, stakes, fibre for weaving, fruit tree pollination, firewood, chook food, nitrogen & phosphate fixing, animal fodder, mulch, and more.

Animals are great in the garden

Animals and nutrient go hand in hand and there is no better way to fertilize your garden than integrating some small animals… writes my colleague and fellow permie Bena Denton...

I’m often surprised at peoples initial hesitation to integrate small animals into their garden. There are many ways that animals can benefit you and your backyard to help turn it into a super abundant garden bursting with an active soil life and fresh produce. Today we look at three small animals…

Where do I plant that fruit tree?

Identifying your site’s “habitats” is the most important factor in matching the right fruit or nut tree to the right spot. By ensuring the plant has as many of the favourable conditions it evolved with as possible, it’s more likely to flourish and furnish you with a crop of fruit, nuts, or berries… writes Bena Denton, my colleague and fellow permie.

To read the whole article plus photos, click here to go to GreenBridge's blog... http://www.greenbridge.co.nz/apps/blog

Smart Planning for an Edible Garden

Get the relationships right between elements in your garden to maximise efficiency and abundance, writes Bena Denton, my colleague and fellow permie...

I love gardening. Even more, I enjoy the satisfaction of surveying a lush, productive landscape… maybe even more than eating the produce! … Until my fresh basil goes onto our pizza, or I look down at my plate and see that this evening everything is from our garden - that’s the ultimate!

Start with a healthy landscape

When you are planning your lifestyle block, look for the patterns in the landscape ... and then the site will almost design itself.

When designing a lifestyle block or farm, I always start with the basics: creating a healthy landscape where lots of water is stored in the ground, springs are restored, and waterways are clean, productive, and not suffering erosion. A healthy landscape is both droughtproof and less flood-prone, and is very productive and resilient. Sadly, little of the NZ landscape is any of these ... so some of the ideas here may be new and surprising.

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